Quintette of Questions: Charlie Cochraine

Quintette asks writers five quick questions. This week’s interview is with:

Charlie Cochrane

BestCorpseForTheJob_1800x2700HiRes1.     What’s the name of your latest book – and how hard was it to pick a title?

The Best Corpse for the Job.  For a long time, when this work was in progress, it was simply called “Contemporary mystery”. When it needed a proper title, the first one I came up with stayed with it. This is pretty unusual, because I’m pretty rubbish at devising titles and often have to brainstorm with my editors to come up with anything like a decent effort!

2.     If you could choose anyone from any time period, who would you cast as the leads in your latest book?

A young Michael Kitchen as Robin and Jonny Wilkinson (yes, I know he’s not an actor, I’m cheating) as Adam. They both have to suggest a certain vulnerability and hidden depths, so those guys would be spot on. I’d rather like to see Tom Hiddlestone as Adam ,too – but then I’d pay to see Tom Hiddlestone read the phone directory.

3.     What five words best describe your story?

Midsomer murders meets Oscar Wilde.

4.     Who is your favourite fictional couple?

Oh, that’s so hard to choose. I do love Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane. And Inspector Alleyn and Agatha Troy. But I suppose I have to choose Laurie Odell and Andrew Raynes from The Charioteer. They don’t have a happy ever after – not on the page, anyway, they do in my mind “after the credits”. But they’re so sweet together, picking their way through a tentative relationship that’s always been love on Laurie’s side.  Beautifully bittersweet.

5.     What song always makes you cry?

There is a certain song which makes me cry and has done so from childhood. I shan’t mention it because just thinking of it gets me sniffly. Instead, I’ll go for Vaughn Williams’s Fantasia on a theme by Thomas Tallis which always brings a tear to my eye, partly because of its use in Master and Commander for the scene where they’re sewing up the dead in their hammocks. Excuse me while I fetch a hankie.

About The Best Corpse for the Job:

Tea and sympathy have never been so deadly.

Schoolteacher Adam Matthews just wants to select a new headteacher and go home. The governors at Lindenshaw St Crispin’s have already tried once to find the right candidate and failed miserably, so it’s make or break this second time round. But when one of the candidates is found strangled in the school, what should have been a straightforward decision becomes as tempestuous as a flash flood in their small English village.

Inspector Robin Bright isn’t thrilled to be back at St. Crispin’s. Memories of his days there are foul enough without tossing in a complicated murder case. And with that handsome young teacher always catching his eye, he has to jot don’t fraternise with a witness in his notebook. It’s not long before Robin is relying on Adam for more than just his testimony.

About Charlie:

Charlie Cochrane author picAs Charlie Cochrane couldn’t be trusted to do any of her jobs of choice—like managing a rugby team—she writes. Her favourite genre is gay fiction, predominantly historical romances/mysteries, with titles published by Carina, Samhain, Bold Strokes, MLR, Riptide and Lethe.

Charlie’s Cambridge Fellows Series of Edwardian romantic mysteries was instrumental in her being named Author of the Year 2009 by the review site Speak Its Name. She’s a member of the Romantic Novelists’ Association, Mystery People, International Thriller Writers Inc and is on the organising team for UK Meet for readers/writers of GLBT fiction. She regularly appears with The Deadly Dames.

Buy The Best Corpse for the Job (Due out as an e-book 24 November)

Would you like to answer a Quintette interview? Email me at nmharrisheart@gmail.com!

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4 thoughts on “Quintette of Questions: Charlie Cochraine

  1. I’m looking forward to this! I’m enjoying your forays into contemporary fiction (e.g. Second Helpings).

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